About

Rachel Lauren Clark is a community volunteer and activist with deep roots in the Toronto Centre community. As a technology innovator, Rachel is currently working with TD Bank Group to develop next-generation payments system.

Like many people in Toronto Centre, Rachel’s story begins somewhere else. Rachel grew up on a farm in upstate New York, before moving to Seattle to join the United States Navy and Marine Corps at 17. When she later left the Navy to pursue a career in Information Technology, she was offered the opportunity to move to Canada, and has never looked back.

After immigrating to Canada 15 years ago, Rachel found herself empowered by the Toronto Centre community. Unlike anywhere else she had lived, the Toronto Centre community inspired Rachel to be herself. She began to live life according to her identity. When Rachel faced discrimination and bigotry as a result of her gender identity, her community stood behind her – supporting her through poverty, depression, and discrimination.

Rachel became stronger, happier, and healthier because of the Toronto Centre community, and has been driven to give back ever since. She strives to ensure that every Ontarian has fair and equal opportunities to be themselves.

Driven by lived experience, Rachel has been an outspoken human rights advocate, passionately fighting for LGBTQ2+ rights, anti-discrimination, and the improvement of health and mental health care services. She has consulted with the Federal Government for the inclusion of Gender Identity and Gender Expression in the Canadian Human Rights Code, and is recognized as an award-winning Trans-Activist.

To give back to her community as a volunteer, Rachel has served as the Secretary of the Board of Directors for Pride Toronto, Chair of the Amnesty International LGBT Action Circle, Education and Training Facilitator for the 519 Community Centre, and is currently President of the Queer Liberals.

Rachel has a degree in Journalism and is currently finishing her Master of Theological Studies at the University of Toronto. She has appeared on several media outlets including CBC Radio One Metro Morning and The Current, in the Vice documentary “On Hold”, has been profiled on CP24, Global, and CTV, and was featured in Toronto Life Magazine